Protective Device Coordination Study

Looking to reduce equipment failures and potential shutdown? Maximize your power system reliability.

Target Issue:

High current faults can cascade upstream in a plant, tripping multiple devices and possibly a whole plant shutdown.

About the Solution:

The study will lead to maximum power system reliability by ensuring that protection is selective and isolates the high current faults.

Most electrical power distribution systems are not planned with protective device coordination in mind. This is often the case when it has been composed of varying manufacturer’s equipment selected by several different individuals over years of operation.

Equipment faults can easily result if protection has not been coordinated throughout the entire plant.

The protective device coordination study by Actemium aims to maximize system reliability by ensuring protection is “selective”. The study will make recommendations so that only the local protection device operates to isolate the high current fault rather than cascading and tripping multiple devices upstream and perhaps a whole plant shutdown.

Coordination also avoids nuisance tripping incidents due to transformer inrush currents and/or heavy motor starting currents.

In a properly coordinated power system, the protective devices are selected and adjusted to minimize the impact of individual equipment failures upon the larger power distribution system.

The protective device coordination study by Actemium aims to maximize system reliability by ensuring protection is “selective”.

 

Benefits & Key Features:

  • Analyzes the characteristic curves of fuses and circuit breakers in a way that areas of concern become apparent.
  • State of the art ETAP computational software is used to analyze and model.
  • Helps avoid nuisance tripping incidents.
  • Reduces downtime.
  • Maximizes power system reliability.

 

Actemium has extensive industrial manufacturing and process sector knowledge with state of the art computational software for modeling power systems to greatly reduce equipment faults with protective device coordination.

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